Collecting and calculating child support payments can seem complicated, but there are many resources available to assist parent, both custodial and non-custodial. In South Carolina, the responsibility of paying child support belongs to the non-custodial parent, known as the obligor. Payments are facilitated through the Department of Social Services' Child Support Enforcement Division, otherwise known as CSED.

Please click on the below link to get an estimate on how much you may be ordered in your case: https://dss.sc.gov/child-support/calculator/

How CSED Can Help You

You can contact The Child Support Enforcement Division for assistance with all child support related matters, but CSED does not deal with child custody. They can help you with all matters related to the following.

Establishing Paternity

You must establish paternity to receive child support. Similarly, a child support order cannot be given unless paternity is proven, or the non-custodial parent's name is on the child birth certificate. CSED can help families obtain the necessary genetic tests.

Assistance in Locating the Other Parent

CSED can help you find the non-custodial parent if they stop paying child support. They can also help in the case that the custodial parent if takes the child and tries to hide from the obligor.

Establishing an Order of Child Support

A child support order typically needs to be established to receive payments. CSED can help set this up and can assist you in making modifications to an existing child support order. Modifications can be made if either parent's financial circumstances have changed significantly, or if state guidelines have changed.

Enforcing an Order of Child Support

CSED can help you act if the obligor fails to make their payments over a period of time. The consequences for not making child support payments can be severe – ranging from wage withholding to the revocation of the obligor's driver’s license. If the obligor loses their job and fails to establish new employment or contact unemployment services, CSED can issue a formal order for the obligor to seek job assistance.

CSED can help you take action if the obligor fails to make their payments over a period of time. The consequences for not making child support payments can be severe – ranging from wage withholding to the revocation of the obligor's drivers license. If the obligor loses their job and fails to establish new employment or contact unemployment services, CSED can issue a formal order for the obligor to seek job assistance.

Addison Addison

Addison Dowling Fender

At the Fender Law Firm, my wife Tracy and I are keeping alive the Fender/Dowling tradition of providing honest and effective legal services to our clients.